Adjusting to civilian life after military service can be hard for veterans. Often, one of the biggest challenges is getting a job and adjusting to office culture. This transition can be especially tough for disabled vets. That’s why many veterans decide to start their own business once they’re back on home soil.

Starting a business can offer vets the flexibility, autonomy, and sense of mission they’ve grown to prefer. And there are many resources, grants, and special financing opportunities that can help.

Choosing a Business

Deciding the type of business to start can be easy if you have a particular passion or talent. But in other cases, it can be a difficult choice. Pick a field that’s in demand and blends your skills and your interests. Here are a few business ideas that leverage the skills you might have learned in the service.

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Franchise

One of the most popular ways to start up a business is to simply own and operate a franchise. One benefit is that you likely don’t have to worry about things like advertising, training, and support. The parent corporation typically takes care of those. Franchising also offers room for growth and expansion.

Event Security

Getting started in the event security field can be a little tricky. But, once you get your name out, the extra work you put in at the beginning will pay off.

Events needing security include concerts, awards shows, and movie festivals. Event security is also a profitable business to get into because there will always be a demand for jobs in this field.

Disaster Planning and Preparation Service

Disasters are constantly happening around us. As sad as it may be, disaster preparedness, planning and response will remain a lucrative business. Communities are always looking for ways to prevent — or respond to — the destruction.

Military training can come in handy as a part of this job. Vets can maintain a level head during high-stakes situations. Be ready to travel or consider the area you live in when starting this type of business.

Construction and General Contracting

If you’re adept at working with tools, consider starting your own construction business. This can be a daunting task but it has high upside.

Make sure you’re comfortable with using construction tools and reading blueprints. You will need a high school diploma or the equal. Completion of some college courses is usually preferred.

You’ll need to get various licenses and certifications to operate heavy machinery. These licenses vary on a state-by-state basis.

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Personal Trainer/Fitness Instructor

Having a military background means you know how to keep your body in peak physical shape. This can come in handy back on home soil when starting your own business as a fitness instructor or personal trainer.

People looking for challenging workouts flock to someone with military training. There’s a reason why they call these fitness classes “boot camps.” Trainers work one-on-one with clients to help them create a fitness plan. You’ll also work helping people hit their personal fitness goals.

As a personal trainer, you run the risk of encountering a medical emergency with one of your clients. You’ll need to complete CPR and AED certifications before beginning your personal training career.

Real Estate, Property Management

There are many reasons why vets make great property managers:

  • You know how to take and give orders
  • You respect the rules and those you work with.

It’s vital for a property manager to know how to follow rules. You’ll also have to explain them to tenants and potential renters.

As a vet, you also know how to take care of supplies, equipment, property, and facilities. Your military experience has also strengthened the interpersonal skills that come in handy for a property manager.

Logistics – Fulfillment, Supply, Shipping

Getting things done in an organized fashion and a timely manner are things you learn in the military. Starting a logistics business can be a great idea for vets.

In fact, logistics and operations positions were recently listed at the top of the list of in-demand jobs for veterans in 2018. In this field, you might be responsible for order fulfillment. This entails shipping products to customers and keeping track of orders.

It can be hard to transition back to civilian life after serving in the military. If working in someone else’s company feels like an uncomfortable fit after a military career, think about starting your own business. Beginning life as an entrepreneur can be tricky, but there are a lot of benefits that come from being your own boss, as well.

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Brad Miller

Brad Miller is a Marine Corps veteran who comes from a military family with a long tradition of service. He and his brother created The Military Guide as a “straight shooters handbook” to provide helpful resources to service men and women at every stage of their military careers – from those first timid steps into the recruiter’s office to walking proudly off base with a DD-214 as a newly minted veteran and beyond.

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